Louise Taylor

Louise Taylor

BA (ANU), LLB (ANU), GDLP (ANU) Admitted as Barrister at ACT Supreme Court (2001)

Biography
Louise Taylor is a Canberra based lawyer who has practised almost exclusively in the area of criminal law. Louise is an Kamilaroi woman born and raised in inner city Sydney whose family originally hails from the New England area of NSW. Louise has a particular interest in women’s issues especially in relation to family, domestic and sexual violence and is passionate about the importance of access to justice for women, particularly for Aboriginal and other marginalised women. For a significant portion of her career Louise was a specialist Family Violence prosecutor at the Office of the ACT Director of Public Prosecutions under the auspices of the award winning ACT Family Violence Intervention Program – this specialist role has had a profound impact on her areas of interest. Louise is a long time Convenor of the ACT Women’s Legal Centre Management Committee, a past member of the ACT Domestic Violence Prevention Council and former Chair of the ACT Ministerial Advisory Council on Women. Louise was the 2009 recipient of the ACT International Women’s Day Award. Louise is a member of the Law Council of Australia’s Indigenous Legal Issues Committee. Louise is currently the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Legal Aid ACT.

Community Participation
Deputy Chair, ACT Ministerial Advisory Council for Women (MACW)
Associate Member, Tawirri, Victorian Indigenous Lawyers Association
Convenor, Management Committee, Women’s Legal Centre (ACT)
Editorial Panel, Indigenous Law Bulletin
Editorial Board, Australian Indigenous Law Bulletin
Editorial Board, Journal of Indigenous Policy
Current research interests
Criminal justice, women’s issues, family and domestic violence

Selected publications
"Deep down, Australia still accepts domestic violence", 2014, The Guardian.

"The Simon Gittany trial should be a wake up call for abusive men", 2013, The Guardian.

"Indigenous imprisonment rates: Australia needs better sentencing", 2013, The Guardian.

"Tony Abbott's plan for Indigenous Australians is fatally flawed", 2013, The Guardian.

"Asking far too much of abused", 2013, The Australian.

"A woman should be indigenous social affairs commissioner", 2009, Sydney Morning Herald.

 “Who’s Your Mob? – The Politics of Aboriginal Identity and the Implications for a Treaty” Treaty: Let’s get in right, 2003 Aboriginal Studies Press.

Stay Connected